The Slave-Holders

Slaveholders in Mamaroneck Township
Slaveholder
Slaves
What we know
Captain James Mott
Name unknown
This male slave appears in the 1698 Census of Mamaroneck. Captain Mott lived in Mamaroneck prior to 1711. (Spikes 1991, 21a)
Samuel Palmer
Name unknown
This female slave appears in the 1698 Census of Mamaroneck. The Palmer family lands encompass much of what is the Village of Larchmont today. (Spikes 1991, 11, with a complete discussion, pp. 9-21a)
Ann Richbell
Name unknown
This female slave appears in the 1698 Census of Mamaroneck. She lived on the East Neck which today is nown as Orienta. (Spikes 1991, 8) According to Spikes (1991, p. 8a) she is buried on a knoll between Mamaroneck Harbor and Rushmore Avenue.

James Mott


Jinny, Banjo Billy
James Mott was a great-grandson of John Richbell.He was a wealthy quaker merchant and preacher who moved to the Mill House on Pryor Manor Road in 1776. (Spikes 2003, p. 17) His two slaves also appear in the memoirs of Richard Mott, the grandson of James Mott. As Quakers, they were opposed to slavery. Yet, the Census record reveals that James Mott maintained three slaves as late as 1810.
Eleazer Goddin
John Cox
Goddin is listed in the Book of Negroes as the owner of this slave.
Ben Cole
Andrew Cole
Cole is listed in the Book of Negroes as the owner of this slave.
William Sutton
Jane
Sutton appears in the Township records as setting Jane free on July 8, 1786. He was a Mamaroneck Town Supervisor, and lived on land we know today as Orienta, (Spikes, 1991, p. 25)
Gilbert Budd
Susannah, Jack, Bet, Pheby, Phebe, Daniel, Hannah, Henry, Bet, Peter, Peter Jr., Sarah, Charles, Hannibal, Jack Purdy, Eliza
He lived on the East Neck – today called Orienta. (Spikes, 1991, p. 34) Gilbert Budd was the Mamaroneck Township Clerk. He officialized recorded many of the entries in the Town records relating to slave ownership and manumission.
Absolom Gidney The 1790 census lists 4 slaves in his household.
Bartholomew Hadden
Name unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding three slaves.
Benjamin Griffin
Peg
The 1790 census lists 5 slaves in his household. He might have been related to Henry Griffen who operated a storehouse in Mamaroneck. (For more about the Griffens , see Spikes, 1991, p. 13)
Edward Merritt
Harry, Gin, Peg.
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding eight slaves, and in 1800 as holding eight slaves. Gin was the daughter of Peg. Township records indicate that he set Harry free.
Charles E. Duncan
Esther, Charlot
Charlot was born on November 18, 1799, daughter of Esther, and was registered by Charles E. Duncan as his property. Duncan purchased property on the north side of the Post Road near to the New Rochelle border in 1799. (Spikes, 1991, p. 31)
William Thompson
Nelly, Sally
Sally was born on April15, 1800, daughter of Nelly, and was registered by William Thompson as his property.
Deborah Horton She appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding seven slaves, and in 1800 as holding five slaves. She lived on the East Neck – today called Orienta. (Spikes, 1991, p. 34)

Peter Jay Munro
Candice
He appears in the Township records as setting Candice free on November 19, 1803.

Peter Jay Munro, was the original resident of the Manor House in Larchmont and a nephew of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Munro does not appear as a slaveholder in the Mamaroneck U.S. Census in 1790. While he maintained his legal residence in New York City, and reported his four slaves to the census there in 1790, he recorded the birth of a child to one of his slaves in Mamaroneck Township in 1814.

David Rogers
Plato, Lilly, Nanny, Harry Rogers
Nanny was born on December 18, 1806, daughter of Lilly, and was registered by David Rogers as his property. Plato was born on September 24, 1803, with no parents identified in the registration, and was registered by David Rogers as his property. Harry Rogers appears in the Township records as being set free on May 25, 1813.
John Peter. D’Lancey
Nanny Pott, Tom Pott, Tom Pott, Jr., Tamar Pott, Jack , Dorothea, Lewis, George, a child named Anne or Nancey, Fred, Harriet, Henry, several children, a cook, as well as a couple named Joseph and Harris.

Tom Pott, Jr. was born on September 25, 1805, son of Nanny and Tom Pott, and was registered by John P. D’Lancey as his property. Tamar was born on April 21, 1808, son of Nanny and Tom Pott, and was registered by John P. D’Lancey as his property. Jack appears in the Township records as being set free on November 15, 1808. George was born on October 10, 1809, son of Dorathea and Lewis, and was registered by John P. D’Lancey as his property. A child named Anne or Nancey was born on October 12, 1814, son of Harriot, and was registered by John P. D’Lancey as his property.

John Peter DeLancey (1753-1828), was a Revolutionary War soldier and the father of William Heathcote DeLancey (1797-1865), a well-known Protestant Episcopal clergyman and provost of the University of Pennsylvania. DeLancey reported no slaves in his household in the 1810 census, but did report eleven “other free persons” – a category for non-white persons who are not slaves – sharing his home. This may be a recording error, or an intentional deception, since he regularly reported in Township records about his slaves.

The references to Fred, Harriet, Henry, Joseph, Harris, several small children and a female cook are in Small Family Memories.

Christopher Hubbs
Jack
Jack appears in the Township records as being set free by Hubbs on November 15, 1808.
Jane Merritt
Grace, Benjamin
She appears in the census 0f 1810 has holding one slave. Benjamin was born on February 28, 1808, son of Grace, and was registered by Jane Merritt as his property. It is not clear what happened to Grace and Benjamin, as only one slave them appeared in the household in 1810. Jane might have been related to John Merritt (see his entry above) who operated a storehouse in Mamaroneck. (For more about the Merrits, see Spikes, 1991, p. 13)
James Gray
Rose, Telemaque
Rose and Telemaque appear in the Township records as being set free by Gray on December 12, 1810.
John Pinkney
Catherine
Catherine appears in the Township records as being set free by Pinkney on April 2, 1811.
Joshua Purdy
Andrew
Township records indicate that James Mott purchased a slave named Andrew from Purdy on May 17, 1811.
James Mott
Andrew
Andrew appears in the Township records as being set free on May 17, 1811. He was set free by James Mott who purchased him for that purpose. The Township record states: “I having purchased of Joshua Purdy a negro man named Andrew who is about 26 years of age, he has the promise of the person I bought him of that he should be free at 28 years of age, and as one object I had in view in the purchase was to secure his freedom, I do hereby declare the said Andrew to be a free man from the date hereof Mamaroneck 15th of May 1811.”
Jack Budd
Mary Jack
Mary Jack appears in the Township records as being set free by Jack Budd December 12, 1812.
Joseph Haight
Harry
Harry appears in the Township records as being set free on March 20, 1817.
Absolom Gidney
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding four slaves.
Giles Simmons
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding one slave.
Mary Sutton
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding two slaves. Mary may have ben related to William Sutton, listed above. Mary might also have been related to Joseph Sutton who operated a storehouse in Mamaroneck. (For more about the Suttons, see Spikes, 1991, p. 13)
Isaac Gidney
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding one slave.
Mary Palmer
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding two slaves.
Peter Allaire
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding four slaves. The Allaire family lived in much of what is considered Larchmont Manor today. To see a map of the Allaire estate, see Spikes, (1991, p. 32 and 33)
Oliver Belly
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding one slave. He lived north of the Post Road bordering on New Rochelle. (Spikes, 1991, p. 13)
Charles Rowe
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1790 has holding one slave.
William Grey
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1800 has holding one slave.
Nathaniel Sachet
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1800 has holding two slaves.
John Sands
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1800 has holding two slaves. Might be a relative of Nathaniel Sands who lived on land along Weaver Street. (See Spikes, 1991, note 406.)
Henry Disinborough, Jr.
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1800 has holding four slaves.
Henry Merritt
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1810 has holding one slave.
John Darby
Unknown
He appears in the census 0f 1810 has holding one slave.
Note: Book references are to Spikes, Judith Doolin, Larchmont New York, People and Places, (Larchmont NY, Fountain Square Books, 1991) and Spikes, Judith Doolin, Images of America – Larchmont (Arcadia Publishing, 2003). The images of James Mott and Jinny and Banjo Billy are from page 17 of the Images book.